Pastoral Ministry  Evaluations  Transitions  Relationship

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Leadership Evaluations

Evaluation happens!

Choosing to build a careful process that is reflective of context and relationship between leaders and the community is encouraged. This set of resources is reflective of the “Pastor-Congregation Model for Resources” that appreciates all are on a journey of learning about the self and how an environment of self-discovery is fostered determines choices and mood for the evaluation experience.

Consider the following questions to help define the focus of the evaluation experience being designed:

  1. Is the pastor relatively new to ministry – within their first 10 years of ministry?
  2. Is the pastor in their first or second term with the congregation?
  3. Has the pastor served the congregation for a significant amount of time (eg. more than 7 years)?

 

  • Answering yes to questions #1 and #2 focuses the review most likely on skill development and encouragement of pastoral vocation of the pastor. The pastor is likely looking for feedback on how their gifts can be sharpened and developed to meet congregational needs best.
  • Answering no to questions #1 and #3, but yes to question #2 indicates the congregation and pastor will benefit most from a review that will focus on how the pastor’s skills are perceived to fit the congregation’s current context. This pastor has significant experience that they want to shape to fit perceived needs in this context.
  • Answering yes to question #3 invites consideration of how this relationship might benefit most from a review that looks at questions and comments in a different way. The document “Evaluation Exercises for Experienced Pastors” helps you to consider your unique circumstances.  This evaluation exercise will likely focus on whether the pastor is best situated to enable the congregation on the next part of the journey.

 

An Explanation of the Process (Link to schematic) Note to Barefoot: The “schematic” is not pretty. Is there someway to do this in an attractive, user-friendly way. I believe the designer would like information to pop up or dropped down when hovered over or clicked on perhaps. HELP! Also, “schematic” is not friendly language. In time I believe all the Leadership forms will take this format.

Evaluation Packet (Link to listing of forms)


 

D Level Site - Schematic of the Process:

       
     
 
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


D or E Level Site - Hover/Drop Down Information

Review of Employment Agreement/Memo of Understanding

Please consider the following items as you prepare by reviewing the employment agreement:

  1. In a situation of known conflict a review process is not advised because it is likely to further polarize as oppose to clarify what is happening. There is an old adage that in a good situation most things work, while in a bad space nothing will has significant merit. Contact your regional church leadership office in this situation, noting your perception of challenges.
  2. Many congregations link term renewal with a review process. Often that review is meant to happen at least six months in advance of term renewal. Reviewing the terms of the employment agreement sets the timeline for when the process needs to be completed, how the results will be shared and with whom, and elements of congregational action (i.e. vote) that will need to be considered.
  3. Review processes are stressful experiences for most pastors. Review processes are meant to encourage and direct a pastor in ways that will help them grow as a pastor and leader. Usually that exercise is also coupled with a decision related to continuing employment. While this component is not unique to pastors, the context of evaluation by a group with uneven expectations is not normative for most. Teachers who experience parents evaluative remarks would be a close example but even that group have immediate supervisors and clear lines of authority that would stress normative expectations for performance. Further, the pastor’s “work world” is also their family’s church and social context. High accountability and emotional intelligence are hallmarks of better review processes.

 

 

 

Establishing a Review Group

Considerations for creating a review group:

  1. Character - Better review processes are ones where the congregation demonstrates high accountability and emotional intelligence in how they work with their pastor through this aspect of ministry. Individuals asked to serve in this capacity need to have the trust of the congregation and demonstrate emotional intelligence that will achieve the goals of this process.
  2. Mandate - The mandate of the review group needs to be clarified and is best not assumed. Generally the mandate includes the following items:
    1. Timeframe for the process or request that this be clarified for leadership
    2. Reporting expectations – generally the review team is asked to report to the leadership group that then decides how further reporting will be made for the congregation. Please note that it is advised that the pastor receives the report or recommendations of the review team prior to that being shared beyond the review group itself.
    3. Recommendations – review teams generate a report that is an analysis of the evaluative data derived from the process. The review team is best instructed as to whether that report should include areas of growth and whether term renewal is encouraged by this group.
  3. Demographics – Congregations will have different traditions regarding who will make up the review group. Keeping the size relatively small (3 -5 people) simplifies scheduling issues while maintaining sufficient depth of resources for data analysis. Congregations generally consider:
    1. Do these individuals have the confidence of the congregation?
    2. Is there some degree of trust between the pastor and this individual?
    3. Are there established expectations of held roles for being on the review team? Generally, it is better for the congregational chairperson not to be a member of the review team given that individual’s need to act on the report when it is completed.

 

 

 

 


 

D Level Site – Evaluation Packet

Pastor and Congregation Evaluation Packet

These evaluation tools are all designed to be used for the growth and betterment of the pastor as well as the congregation as a whole.

Included in this packet:

  • Formal Reviews (3-5 years)
    • Solo Minister (solo pastor of congregation)
      • Pastoral Reviews and Personnel Policies: Solo Pastor (Link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/9030)
      • Overview: Solo Ministry (Link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/9024)

    • Team Ministry with Lead Pastor (review for multi-staff congregations with lead pastor supervising other pastors),
      • Pastoral Reviews and Personnel Policies: Team Ministry with a Lead pastor (Link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/9025)
      • Overview: Team Ministry with Lead Pastor (link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/9028)
      • Multiple Staff Ministry Team Reviews (Appreciative Way) (Link to: DropBox: Leadership Resources/Evaluations/Multiple Staff Ministry Team Review Appreciative.pdf)

    • Shared Team Ministry (review for multi-staff congregations with personnel committee supervising pastors)
      • Pastoral Reviews and Personnel Policies: Shared Team Ministry (Link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/9027)
      • Overview: Shared Team Ministry (Link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/9026)
      • Multiple Staff Ministry Team Reviews (Appreciative Way) (Link to: DropBox: Leadership Resources/Evaluations/Multiple Staff Ministry Team Review Appreciative.pdf)

 

  • Pastor/Congregation Review – Appreciative Inquiry evaluation shifts from a problem-based to a strength-based approach while also identifying areas for growth in ministry. The focus is to identify what is life giving in a formative, future oriented way
    • Pastoral/Congregational Review: The Appreciative Way (Link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/9029)

  • Informal Assessments
    • Pastoral Assessment around the Six Core Competencies (link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/9031)
      This tool can be helpful in assessing the pastor’s ministry balance around the competencies identified in our denominations. These six areas can be processed together or on a rhythm which seems manageable for your local context.
    • First Year Review of Pastor in New Congregational Assignment
      During the first year of a ministry it is imperative for the channels of feedback between the lay leaders of the congregation and the pastor be as open and honest as possible. This short feedback tool is to help facilitate such conversations for alignment, growth and enhanced years of ministry.
      • First Year Review in a New Pastor-Congregation Relationship (Link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/19514)


 

Evaluation happens!

Choosing to build a careful process that is reflective of context and relationship between leaders and the community is encouraged. This set of resources is reflective of the “Pastor-Congregation Model for Resources” that appreciates all are on a journey of learning about the self and how an environment of self-discovery is fostered determines choices and mood for the evaluation experience.

Consider the following questions to help define the focus of the evaluation experience being designed:

  1. Is the pastor relatively new to ministry – within their first 10 years of ministry?
  2. Is the pastor in their first or second term with the congregation?
  3. Has the pastor served the congregation for a significant amount of time (eg. more than 7 years)?

 

  • Answering yes to questions #1 and #2 focuses the review most likely on skill development and encouragement of pastoral vocation of the pastor. The pastor is likely looking for feedback on how their gifts can be sharpened and developed to meet congregational needs best.
  • Answering no to questions #1 and #3, but yes to question #2 indicates the congregation and pastor will benefit most from a review that will focus on how the pastor’s skills are perceived to fit the congregation’s current context. This pastor has significant experience that they want to shape to fit perceived needs in this context.
  • Answering yes to question #3 invites consideration of how this relationship might benefit most from a review that looks at questions and comments in a different way. The document “Evaluation Exercises for Experienced Pastors” helps you to consider your unique circumstances.  This evaluation exercise will likely focus on whether the pastor is best situated to enable the congregation on the next part of the journey.

 

An Explanation of the Process (Link to schematic) Note to Barefoot: The “schematic” is not pretty. Is there someway to do this in an attractive, user-friendly way. I believe the designer would like information to pop up or dropped down when hovered over or clicked on perhaps. HELP! Also, “schematic” is not friendly language. In time I believe all the Leadership forms will take this format.

Evaluation Packet (Link to listing of forms)


 

D Level Site - Schematic of the Process:

       
     
 
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


D or E Level Site - Hover/Drop Down Information

Review of Employment Agreement/Memo of Understanding

Please consider the following items as you prepare by reviewing the employment agreement:

  1. In a situation of known conflict a review process is not advised because it is likely to further polarize as oppose to clarify what is happening. There is an old adage that in a good situation most things work, while in a bad space nothing will has significant merit. Contact your regional church leadership office in this situation, noting your perception of challenges.
  2. Many congregations link term renewal with a review process. Often that review is meant to happen at least six months in advance of term renewal. Reviewing the terms of the employment agreement sets the timeline for when the process needs to be completed, how the results will be shared and with whom, and elements of congregational action (i.e. vote) that will need to be considered.
  3. Review processes are stressful experiences for most pastors. Review processes are meant to encourage and direct a pastor in ways that will help them grow as a pastor and leader. Usually that exercise is also coupled with a decision related to continuing employment. While this component is not unique to pastors, the context of evaluation by a group with uneven expectations is not normative for most. Teachers who experience parents evaluative remarks would be a close example but even that group have immediate supervisors and clear lines of authority that would stress normative expectations for performance. Further, the pastor’s “work world” is also their family’s church and social context. High accountability and emotional intelligence are hallmarks of better review processes.

 

 

 

Establishing a Review Group

Considerations for creating a review group:

  1. Character - Better review processes are ones where the congregation demonstrates high accountability and emotional intelligence in how they work with their pastor through this aspect of ministry. Individuals asked to serve in this capacity need to have the trust of the congregation and demonstrate emotional intelligence that will achieve the goals of this process.
  2. Mandate - The mandate of the review group needs to be clarified and is best not assumed. Generally the mandate includes the following items:
    1. Timeframe for the process or request that this be clarified for leadership
    2. Reporting expectations – generally the review team is asked to report to the leadership group that then decides how further reporting will be made for the congregation. Please note that it is advised that the pastor receives the report or recommendations of the review team prior to that being shared beyond the review group itself.
    3. Recommendations – review teams generate a report that is an analysis of the evaluative data derived from the process. The review team is best instructed as to whether that report should include areas of growth and whether term renewal is encouraged by this group.
  3. Demographics – Congregations will have different traditions regarding who will make up the review group. Keeping the size relatively small (3 -5 people) simplifies scheduling issues while maintaining sufficient depth of resources for data analysis. Congregations generally consider:
    1. Do these individuals have the confidence of the congregation?
    2. Is there some degree of trust between the pastor and this individual?
    3. Are there established expectations of held roles for being on the review team? Generally, it is better for the congregational chairperson not to be a member of the review team given that individual’s need to act on the report when it is completed.

 

 

 

 


 

D Level Site – Evaluation Packet

Pastor and Congregation Evaluation Packet

These evaluation tools are all designed to be used for the growth and betterment of the pastor as well as the congregation as a whole.

Included in this packet:

  • Formal Reviews (3-5 years)
    • Solo Minister (solo pastor of congregation)
      • Pastoral Reviews and Personnel Policies: Solo Pastor (Link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/9030)
      • Overview: Solo Ministry (Link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/9024)

    • Team Ministry with Lead Pastor (review for multi-staff congregations with lead pastor supervising other pastors),
      • Pastoral Reviews and Personnel Policies: Team Ministry with a Lead pastor (Link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/9025)
      • Overview: Team Ministry with Lead Pastor (link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/9028)
      • Multiple Staff Ministry Team Reviews (Appreciative Way) (Link to: DropBox: Leadership Resources/Evaluations/Multiple Staff Ministry Team Review Appreciative.pdf)

    • Shared Team Ministry (review for multi-staff congregations with personnel committee supervising pastors)
      • Pastoral Reviews and Personnel Policies: Shared Team Ministry (Link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/9027)
      • Overview: Shared Team Ministry (Link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/9026)
      • Multiple Staff Ministry Team Reviews (Appreciative Way) (Link to: DropBox: Leadership Resources/Evaluations/Multiple Staff Ministry Team Review Appreciative.pdf)

 

  • Pastor/Congregation Review – Appreciative Inquiry evaluation shifts from a problem-based to a strength-based approach while also identifying areas for growth in ministry. The focus is to identify what is life giving in a formative, future oriented way
    • Pastoral/Congregational Review: The Appreciative Way (Link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/9029)

  • Informal Assessments
    • Pastoral Assessment around the Six Core Competencies (link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/9031)
      This tool can be helpful in assessing the pastor’s ministry balance around the competencies identified in our denominations. These six areas can be processed together or on a rhythm which seems manageable for your local context.
    • First Year Review of Pastor in New Congregational Assignment
      During the first year of a ministry it is imperative for the channels of feedback between the lay leaders of the congregation and the pastor be as open and honest as possible. This short feedback tool is to help facilitate such conversations for alignment, growth and enhanced years of ministry.
      • First Year Review in a New Pastor-Congregation Relationship (Link to: https://www.commonword.ca/ResourceView/43/19514)